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Baller Quotes to Live By


  1. "I admit I don't always know what I'm doing, but I definitely believe in it. I'm a man of my own conviction. Not that it always works out..." - Me
  2. "If the 'sane' people are telling you to go back to doing 'sane' things, you might be the one person who changes the world." - Me
  3. "Nothing is ever anything unless you make it something." - Me
  4. "Live life on the curve... hopefully a big one!" - Me (from living on many grade curves at Georgia Tech)
  5. "When Regret > Fear, you can inspire change" - Me
  6. "Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity." - Seneca, Roman Philosopher
  7. "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take." - Wayne Gretzsky, NHL Hall of Famer
  8. "I know it's weird writing this to you on this day, but life speeds by and there is simply no time to leave the right words unspoken." - Michael Cheshire in Huffington Post's "An Open Letter to My Now Ex-Wife"
  9. "It was far easier to have a good experience on Mint. Everything I've mentioned--not being dependent on a single source provider, preserving users' privacy, helping users actually make positive change in their financial lives-- all of those things are great, rational reasons to pursue what we pursued. But none of them matter if the product is harder to use."Mark Hedlund (source)
  10. "That kind of drive--her determination--it reminds me that especially with opera, the odds of succeeding are so slim. But it's about the daily efforts. That makes a difference. Keeping up the hope despite the circumstances."Wendy Wang via Inc.com's "Here's What Happened When 5 Harvard Students Worked in a Chinese Factory" referencing a Chinese factory worker who studied and practice translating every spare second to become a translator one day
  11. "Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." - Albert Einstein
  12. "I just use my muscles as a conversation piece, like someone walking a cheetah down 42nd Street."  - Arnold Schwarzenegger
  13. "It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat."  - Theodore Roosevelt

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