CNBC reported a few days ago how Robert Wang, founder and CEO of the company behind Instant Pot, still reads all (more likely most) of customer reviews on Amazon (article link). That totals almost 39,000 reviews of the invention he launched almost 7 years ago modernizing the original Crock-Pot.
Wang looks to customer reviews as sources of inspiration and quality assurance. For example, Wang cites reviews for the inspiration to build the Bluetooth-connected iteration of the beloved Instant Pot.
Instant Pot’s Amazon-first sales channel has enabled Wang to spend little on advertising and focus almost strictly on product. This strategy has helped the Instant Pot to sell over 215,000 units on Amazon’s Prime Day recently. Yes, that’s in hundreds ofthousands. Impressive.
Wang is not a business man by trade (or entrepreneur); though, Wang did cofound a messaging company prior to Instant Pot (before being forced out.) Instead, Wang is an engineer. He and his cofounders focused on the product. They made the product great with smart marketing tactics (leveraging social media).
Make a great product. Delight customers. Be opportunistic.
I have a new idea.
It’s not technology-based. It’s a hard-good.
It’s not as innovative as other ideas. It’s practical. Hugely practical.
It’s not going require a sales team. It’s going to be heavily marketing-driven as the go-to-market strategy.
It’s not something that will be immediately scalable.
It’s not a product I thought about doing before. It’s in a market I’ve always loved.
It’s going to be so incredibly hard. It’s going to test me in a way that I haven’t before. It’s going to require skills and knowledge I don’t yet have. It’s going to be fun.
I think I know the early team. I think I know how I will start to build and market. I don’t know if I will have the funds to pull this off. I’m more excited than ever to try.
I can’t wait to share it with you.

As I’m sitting at Disney World resort in Orlando, I’m reminded of the breadth and depth of Disney’s influence in today’s world. The company is one of the largest conglomerates in the world with a Wikipedia page listing its assets longer than probably 90% of other pages. Seriously, I was that fascinated. Their attention to detail as well as the size of assets and facilities like Walt Disney World and its many resorts just in Orlando are breath-taking.

Citing Wikipedia’s page of “List of Assets Owned by Disney“, take a look:

The Walt Disney Studios[edit]

Production[edit]

Animation[edit]

Lucasfilm Ltd.[edit]

Marvel Studios[edit]

  • Marvel Music
  • Marvel Film Productions LLC (Delaware)
  • MVL Development LLC (Delaware)
  • MVL Productions LLC: an indirect wholly owned film development subsidiary
  • MVL Film Finance LLC: holder of Marvel’s Movie debt and theatrical film rights to the twelve characters and supporting characters as collateral.
  • MVL Rights, LLC: subsidiary holding movie rights of all Marvel Characters with some on contract with MVL Film Finance
  • Iron Works Productions LLC: subsidiary holding debt to finance the Iron Man films.
  • Incredible Production (Delaware)
  • Asgard Productions LLC (Delaware)

Distribution[edit]

Disney Music Group[edit]

Disney Theatrical Group[edit]

Disney Studio Services[edit]

Sources[11][12]

Disney Consumer Products and Interactive Media[edit]

Disney Retail[edit]

  • Disney Store Worldwide, Inc.
    • Disney Store North America
    • Disney Store Europe
    • Disney Store Japan
    • Disney Shopping, Inc. (formerly Disney Direct Marketing Services, Inc.) catalog and direct marketing channels[13]
      • Disneystore.com
      • Disneybaby.com
      • The Walt Disney Catalog
  • Disney Direct Response Publishing, Inc.
  • Integrated Retail, consolidates all other North American retail channels

Disney Games & Apps[edit]

DCPI Content[edit]

  • Disney Digital Network
  • DCPI Content & Media
    • Advanced Media
    • Social Media[18] and Micro Content
    • Disney Co/Op, custom content[18] and all platform ad sales
    • Disney.com
    • Disney Style
    • Oh My Disney[18]
    • Disney LOL[18]
    • Babble.com[18]
    • Disney Family (Family.com)
    • Go.com: formerly GO Network
    • StarWars.com[19]

Disney Publishing Worldwide[edit]

  • Core Publishing[20]
    • Disney Magazine Publishing, Inc.
    • Disney Libri
    • Disney Libros (Spain)
    • Disney Book Group (Disney Book Publishing, Inc.[2])
  • Digital Publishing – Disney Book Apps
  • Disney Learning
  • CrossGen: restarted & discontinued as an imprint by Marvel Comics

Walt Disney Parks and Resorts[edit]

Walt Disney Parks and Resorts Worldwide, Inc. owns and operates two resorts in the United States and another three internationally through various joint ventures and licensing agreements.

Disneyland Resort[edit]

Walt Disney World Resort[edit]

Disneyland Paris[edit]

Ambox current red.svg
This section needs to be updatedPlease update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information. (June 2017)
The WDC has taken full ownership of Euro Disneyland, minority holdings within subsidiary may not be accurate
Opened on 12 April 1992 as the Euro Disney Resort. Located in Marne-la-ValléeFrance Euro Disney Investments, Inc.
  • Euro Disney S.A.S.: 100% Disney owned—manages Euro Disney S.C.A., Euro Disney Associés and EDL Hotels SCA
  • Euro Disney Investment SAS: owning 9% and general partner of Euro Disney Associés
  • Centre de Congrès Newport S.A.S
    • Newport Bay Club Convention Centre: leased to EDL Hôtels S.C.A.
  • EDL Holding Co.: 99.9% owned by Disney — holds 82% ownership of Euro Disney S.C.A.
    • EDL Participations S.A.S.: sole general partner of Euro Disney S.C.A.
      • Euro Disney S.C.A.: 2% owned by public shareholders, directly owns 82% of Euro Disney Associés
        • Euro Disney Commandité S.A.S.: a general partner of Euro Disney Associés
          • Euro Disney Associés S.C.A.: operating company of Disney Paris
            • EDL Hôtels S.C.A.: owns the Phase IB land and operates the hotels
            • EDL Services SAS: manages Phase IB Financing Companies, owners of the various hotels and Disney Village
Euro Disneyland Participations S.A.S.: 100% Disney owned and owns 17% of

Hong Kong International Theme Parks[edit]

Disney 48%, Hong Kong Government 52%

Shanghai Disney Resort[edit]

  • Shanghai International Theme Park Company Limited: 43% owned by Disney, 57% owned by Shanghai Shendi Group: owner company for theme parks within the resort
  • Shanghai International Theme Park Associated Facilities Company Limited: 43% owned by Disney, 57% owned by Shanghai Shendi Group—owner company for associated facilities within the resort
  • Shanghai International Theme Park and Resort Management Company Limited: 70% owned by Disney, 30% owned by Shanghai Shendi Group—manages the resort as a whole as well as the project to develop it

New Vacation Operations[edit]

Fully: New Vacation Operations and Disney Cruise Line

Disney Media Networks[edit]

Disney–ABC Television Group[edit]

ABC, Inc. d.b.a. Disney–ABC Television Group[24]

A&E Networks[edit]

Joint venture with Hearst Corporation; 50% equity holding

ABC Entertainment Group[edit]

ABC Family Worldwide[edit]

ABC Owned Television Stations[edit]

Disney Channels Worldwide[edit]

Production

ESPN Inc.[edit]

Disney (80%) [30]

Marvel Entertainment[edit]

  • Cover Concepts, Inc.
  • Marvel Characters, Inc.
  • Marvel Television division
    • Marvel Animation
      • Marvel Animation Studios (2012–present)
        • SH DTV Partners (2012–present)
    • Squad Productions LLC (Delaware)
    • Green Guy Toons LLC (Delaware)
  • MVL Iron Works Productions Canada, Inc. (Province of Ontario)
  • MVL Incredible Productions Canada, Inc. (Province of Ontario)
  • Marvel Entertainment International Limited (United Kingdom)
  • Marvel Internet Productions LLC (Delaware)
  • Marvel Property, Inc. (Delaware)
  • Marvel Toys Limited (Hong Kong)
  • MVL Development LLC (Delaware)
  • Marvel International Character Holdings LLC (Delaware)
  • MRV, Inc. (Delaware)
  • MVL International C.V. (The Netherlands)
  • Marvel Characters B.V. (The Netherlands)
  • Marvel Worldwide, Inc.
  • Marvel Toys
    • Marvel Toys Limited (Hong Kong)

International[edit]

Disney International

Germany[edit]

  • Disney Television (Germany), Inc.[2]
  • RTL Disney TV Limited Partnership (RTL DISNEY Fernsehen GmbH & Co. KG) a 50% joint venture of TWDC with RTL Group
    • [34] Kividoo – kids SVOD service
    • Scoyo learning platform
    • Super RTL network, Germany
    • Toggolino Club
    • Toggo Plus network (June 4, 2016)
  • Tele-Munich Television Media Participation Limited Partnership (Tele-Müchen Fernseh-GMBH & Co. Medienbeteiligung KG)[35] joint venture
    • ATV Private Limited Partnership (ATV PrivatFernseh-GMBH)
      • ATV2 channel, Austria
    • RTL 2 Limited Partnership (RTL 2 FERNSEHEN GMBH & CO. kg)
      • RTL II channel, Germany
      • RTL II HD channel, Germany
    • RTL 2 Austria
    • TM-TV GMBH
      • Tele 5 (Germany)
      • Tele 5 HD (Germany)
      • Tele 5 (Austria)

Walt Disney Co., Ltd. Japan[edit]

Disney India Inc.[edit]

  • UTV Software Communications (100% stake since 2/2012)
    • UTV Communications (USA) LLC
    • IG Interactive Entertainment Ltd.
    • UTV Global Broadcasting Ltd.
    • UTV TV Content Ltd.
    • UTV Games Ltd.
    • First Future Agri & Developers Ltd.
    • UTV Motion Pictures PLC
      • UTV Toons
    • UTV New Media Ltd
    • Indiagames Ltd
    • group’s stepdown subsidiaries
      • UTV Ignition Entertainment Ltd.
      • True Games Interactive
      • Genx Entertainment Ltd.
      • UTV Entertainment Television Ltd.
      • UTV Tele-Talkies Ltd.
      • RB Entertainment Ltd.
      • Vikatan UTV Content Ltd.
    • Screenshot Television Ltd.[38]

The Walt Disney Company Iberia S.L.[edit]

Sociedad Gestora de Television NET TV SA, joint venture with Vocento SA, Intereconomía Corporation SA[39]

Other[edit]

Catalogs and libraries[edit]

Films[edit]

Television[edit]

Property holding companies[edit]

  • Carousel Holdings EAT LLC, Carousel Inn & Suites, Anaheim, California[55]
  • Axman Realty Corp.
  • Boss Realty, Inc.
  • Commercial Apartment Properties, Inc.
  • The Celebration Co.
  • Disney Keystone Properties, Inc.
  • Disney Realty, Inc.
  • Dutchman Realty, Inc.
  • The Dolphin Hotel, Inc.
  • Homestead Homes, Inc.
  • The Little Lake Bryan Co.
  • Maple Leaf Commercial Properties, Inc.
  • The Swan Hotel, Inc.
  • Walt Disney Properties Corp.[2]
  • Buena Vista Street, Burbank CA
    • Pine Woods Properties, Inc.
    • Holmes Houses, Inc.
    • Key Bridge Properties, Inc.
  • Florida properties
    • Lake Bryan, Inc.
    • Madeira Land Co., Inc.
    • Magnolia Creek Development Co.[2]

Financial[edit]

  • Arvida Disney Financial Services Inc.
    • Arvida Real Estate Capital Inc., a commercial real estate investment banking subsidiary to arrange financing for commercial, industrial and retail projects[56]

Venture capital[edit]

Steamboat Ventures: ownership positions not revealed
  • Baynote
  • EdgeCast
  • Elemental Technologies
  • EMN8
  • Fanzter, Inc.
  • Fastclick
  • FreeWheel
  • GameSalad
  • GoPro
  • Greystripe
  • Kapow Software
  • MediaBank
  • MerchantCircle
  • Passenger
  • Photobucket
  • RazorGator
  • Vobile
  • VoodooVox
  • Zettics[57]

Chinese holdings[edit]

  • 51Fanli
  • Bokecc
  • Cocoa China
  • Gridsum Technology
  • Netmovie
  • Shangpin
  • Troodon
  • UUSee
  • Yoyi Media
  • YY[58]

Unsorted[edit]

  • 2139 Empire Avenue Corp.
  • Alameda Payroll, Inc.
  • Andes Productions, Inc.
  • Animation Collectors, Inc.
  • BVHV Services
  • Before & After Productions, Inc.
  • Berl Holding Co.
  • Billy B. Productions, Inc.
  • Bird-In-Hand Woodworks, Inc.
  • Blue Note Management Corp.
  • Buena Vista Catalog Co.
  • Buena Vista Laboratories, Inc.
  • Buena Vista Trading Co.
  • C.A. Productions, Inc.
  • DCSR, Inc.
  • Devonson Corp.
  • Disney Art Editions, Inc.
  • Disney Computer Magazine Group, Inc.
  • Disney Interfinance Corp.
  • Disney International Employment Services, Inc.
  • Disney Media Ventures, Inc.
  • Disney Special Programs, Inc.
  • Disney, Inc.
  • ERS Investment Ltd.
  • Entertainment Development, Inc.
  • Film Brothers Property Corp.
  • From Time to Time Inc.
  • Hardware Distribution, Inc.
  • Heavy Weight, Inc.
  • Hodi Investments, Inc.
  • Hughes Flying Boat Corp.
  • IJR, Inc.(inactive)
  • Indian Warrior Productions, Inc.
  • J.B. Productions, Inc.
  • Kelly Management, Inc.
  • LBV Services, Inc.
  • Merriweather Productions, Inc. (inactive)
  • Montrose Corp.
  • One For All Productions, Inc.
  • PNLH Payroll Inc.
  • Palm Hospitality Co.
  • Plymouth Productions
  • RCE Services, Inc.
  • Stakeout Two Productions, Inc.
  • Supercomm International, Inc.
  • Swing Kids Productions, Inc.
  • The Inn Corp.
  • The Quiz Show Co.[2]
  • Theme Park Productions, Inc.
  • Toon Town, Inc.
  • Voice Quality Coordination, Inc.
  • WCO Leisure, Inc.
  • WCO Parent Corp.
  • WCO Port Management Corp.
  • WCO Port Properties, Ltd.
  • WCO Vacationland, Inc.
  • WDT Services, Inc.
  • WDW Services, Inc.
  • Wanderlust Productions, Inc.
Target persona is a marketer’s depiction of the profile of a single target consumer. Typically, persona includes the demographic profile of an individual. It may also include the motivations of the individual. For Body Boss, target personas included high school football coaches, collegiate strength and conditioning coaches, collegiate football coaches, professional baseball coaches, etc. Understanding the internal narrative of any persona could be the difference between making a genuine connection (and sale) or being swept aside with the rest of spam.
Google “internal narrative”, and you are left with how to write one, change one, or mixed in with “internal monologue”. My back-of-the-napkin definition is “personal story”.
Marrying the idea of internal narrative with persona would be a crude way of applying something specific and powerful to something otherwise abstract. Instead, internal narrative should be applied to the exact person being engaged with (in sales) – highlight “internal” as how she tells her story.
Persona-wise, I am a 30-year-old male sales and marketing leader at a startup. (There’s more, but let’s leave it at that.)
My internal narrative dives much deeper into who I am. I am highly ambitious with strong entrepreneurial ambitions. My role at SalesWise is to lead and learn. This will help me in the next phase of my career. I care about leveraging technology to further my team and company’s capabilities. With my company and team’s success, so will my own success.
My internal narrative is attuned to my goals, character, risk tolerance, etc. For a sales professional to effectively engage with me, s/he must go beyond my persona and understand my internal narrative – trigger a deeper truth and purpose.
Understand the difference between persona and internal narrative. Apply each accordingly.
It’s been a while since I took a real-world “funny event” and pulled entrepreneurship lessons from it – notables include being attacked by a ninja cat and then the intruder at 4AM.
Let me share with you how excited I am about being in a new relationship – I backed into my new girlfriend’s car. It was a typical Sunday morning heading to the gym. Except this time, I added a nice dent to her driver door and my passenger-side rear bumper.
I don’t normally have cars parked where she parked, and I was on auto-pilot. Sadly, auto-pilot does not include auto-awareness. No excuses here – I should’ve been watching.
Quick lessons:
  1. Comfort can breed complacency. I was comfortable in my Sunday morning routine – comfortable in driveway routine. Add in a wrinkle such as a car in an unusual position, and I fail to realize it. Be mindful. Always.
  2. Technology still requires attention. I have a rearview camera and backup sensors. None of it matters if I don’t pay them attention. Backup sensors work well when the driver knows there is an object coming closer. None of it is useful without attention.
  3. All about damage control. Once I heard the crunching of metal, I knew what I had done. I had to go tell the girlfriend, notify insurance, and get ready to allocate time and money to remedy this. Once the damage is done, it’s all about reaction. (Luckily, my girlfriend’s reaction was of understanding and a positive laugh about it.)

The first and third lessons are the most important. The first lesson is about prevention. It’s about diligence and awareness. The third lesson is about adapting. Not everything will be controllable. Reaction is critical to get back on path, or onto a new normal.

In keeping with my theme of sales books this year, I read David Sandler’s You Can’t Teach A Kid To Ride A Bike At A Seminar. Sandler is also the founder of the sales training company with hundreds of franchise locations across the world – Sandler Sales Institute.
I was recommended this book from a former Sandler sales trainer as one of the preeminent books on sales like SPIN Selling and The Challenger Sale. It was one of the first books to break down the complex sales process, and was written to heavily qualify sales opportunities. The gist, like SPIN, was to get the prospect to qualify themselves and want to buy vs. the sales rep selling.
I admit this wasn’t my favorite sales book. It wouldn’t be in my top “self-help” books. However, I think I need to re-read the book to better understand the pieces of the book. As it stands, I was thrown off by the many self-promotions of the book and its clear lead for the Sandler Training courses.
All that being said, here were my top take-aways:
  • Sandler goes into depth and length into teaching the reader to separate the Identity and Role of a person (I/R). Sandler recognizes the difficulty of sales and “close” rates such that results can be de-motivating. He wants readers to recognize that sales not who a person is – trying to separate who someone is with what needs to be done. Thus, sales can be coached and improved.
  • Monkey’s fist is a sales concept borrowed from marine life – instead of tossing a heavy rope to tie up a boat, shipmen will toss over a lighter “monkey’s fist” that is tied to the heavier rope. This allows a reciver on a dock to easily catch the fist and reel in the heavy rope. This concept is used in sales as a means to easy a prospect into a sale rather than going full bore into a sale.
  • Buyers buy when they feel OK. This can be counter to aspects of The Challenger Sale where a Challenger teaches/ challenges a prospect. In many ways, this can put prospects off. Sandler points out that buyers want to feel “OK”. If they don’t feel OK, then they will be defensive and not in a receptive position to listen to you.
  • Mitigate buyer’s remorse when a prospect may back out at the last second, or cancel an order shortly after buying. In this case, Sandler offers tips to slow down the sales cycle by offering a recap of what the buyer is looking for, how the product/ service enables the prospect, and confronting any “negative” feelings head-on. Sandler highlights the importance to follow up with prospects to make sure they want what is being bought. This is another area where reverse psychology can play a role making the buyer talk him/ herself into completing the buy and being happy with the decision.
  • Using an upfront contract throughout the sales cycle helps the prospect agree on nexdt steps prior to any step is truly taken. This enables prospects to more likely move forward with a sale – “advance”.

As I said, this was not one of my favorite sales books. It is indeed packed with good sales information. However, it was not the more engaging reads while the breadth of the book was a lot to absorb.

Recently finished Marshall Goldsmith and Mark Reiter’s What Got You Here, Won’t Get You Here. It was cited in a meeting with a startup cofounder as a helpful book for his own success (and his company’s).
Off the bat, I was expecting a busy book of sorts, but instead, realized that the “You” in the title was more about YOU. The context shifted quickly, and I wasn’t prepared for it. Meanwhile, I didn’t know what to expect, let alone chapters and break-downs of how those who wish to ascend to greater success must constantly improve… starting with the things that – shall we say – rub people the wrong way. Yes, the book actually delved into character faults.
Goldsmith dives into 20 habits/ faults/ common rubs describing situations, ways to catch them, importance of resolving, resolutions, and some anecdotal results.
Here were some of my take-aways:
  • The book starts out acknowledging readers and leaders have all reached where they are, but that it may not actually help get them to the top. Oftentimes, folks who have been successful can attribute their success to personal talent and achievement. However, as they ascend, their influence commonly spans wider audiences. This can amplify personal habits that could stifle further progression.
  • One of the keys Goldsmith talks about to assess habits that negatively impact others including the self is surveying folks across the organization who come in contact and even those beyond – at home, as one example. Usually, this scope of feedback is much wider and deeper than what one may expect or ask – consider a leader who is looking to improve him/ herself. In this case, their list of folks to canvas would often times be much narrower focus than who Goldsmith would approach. This provides a holistic view that can identify habits’ reach and effect.

Per earlier, there were 20 habits mentioned. I read this book over a couple months, and admit I couldn’t recall many of them. However, as I look at a book summary to help jog my mind, I remember each easily. The habits are… not necessarily anything new. However, like many great minds, Goldsmith is able to put structure to habits to construct this list.

  • “Adding too much value: The overwhelming desire to add our two cents to every discussion.” As I write this, I realize that pointing out how I’ve recognized this in myself and how I’m trying to lessen how often I do this, I’m doing almost exactly what this habit is about – adding what I think, what I’ve done, etc. All to get some recognition. When I think about adding more of “me”, I stop and ask, “does this actually help XX?”
  • “Speaking when angry.” I just did this. I’ve been frustrated with a doctor’s office as I’ve been dealing with a chronic neck pain (herniated disc). When a doctor’s assistant called me due to a legitimately good reason (I could die without recognition of this), I responded very short-tempered. I was angry. I was tired of being passed around. I shouldn’t have.
  • “Neativity, or ‘Let me explain why that won’t work’”. This is something I have done, too. As I continue to lead and manage others (or have any relationship with others), I can be quick to jump to conclusions or express why others’ ideas won’t work. It’s unfortunate as I can stifle the others’ creativity while closing me off to new perspectives.  
  • “Refusing to express regret”. This isn’t done enough – I regret… I’m sorry… I talked to the doctor’s assistant the day after and apologized. She was just the messenger.
  • “Not listening”. Listening lets me absorb and learn. It can be done passively and actively. If I’m always pushing my thoughts, I don’t learn. I don’t expand my domain.
  • “Punishing the messenger”. Yeah, I just did this. See the story above. Maybe it’s moments like this that crystallize in me of how easy it is to keep doing the negative habits that will prevent me from being who I want to be.
  • “Failing to express gratitude”. It’s easy to live life and take things for granted – many times from the people who are closest to us (me). I feel that I should remember that each relationship is precious and must be constantly earned.

There are a lot of habits. Goldsmith did not offer a solution that I found to be effective to absorbing the habits, let alone being cognizant of them. Like the sales books (e.g. the Challenger Sale, SPIN), I can’t try to improve on everything. Instead, I have listed a subset of the habits that resonated with me most. I will work on the subset (or a subset of the subset). It takes practice. It takes diligence. However, my “There” is not that far, and I need to be ready to grasp it when it’s in front of me.

As I thought about how to start this post, I wanted to say, “I’m not a writer”. Except, I write – a lot. It’s fair to say, then, I’m a writer. I wasn’t always a writer, and I can’t comment if I’m good or not. I can say, however, that I am always improving.
Take this forum of “The ‘Rules’ of Writing” from StackOverflow. It’s fun to read what advice others give for effective writing. Here are some of my favorites:
  • Show, don’t tell. This one hits home perhaps because of my former online dating profiles. Yes, I said it. Too often, people state they’re “nice, like to travel, funny”. It’s incredibly generic and easy for anyone to say this. Instead, a well-written profile and accompanying pictures say much more, concisely, and accurately.
  • Give yourself permission to suck. Maybe I do this all the time? J Point is that when you relinquish the need to be good, let alone perfect, you get to write. You get to post. You become a writer.
  • Write, don’t edit. I adopted this perhaps 150 posts ago – write the post completely, and let it sit. Then, revisit day(s) later and only edit then. Too often writers can get stuck thinking of ways to rewrite what was just written before getting the full idea out.
  • You have to read, and read all the time. Effective writers (and entrepreneurs) are constantly curious – always learning. They’re always reading and soaking in the world. Reading (learning) provides perspective which provides creativity.

In general, you just have to write. In many cases, constant practice is better than trying to be perfect. Constant practice leads to better writing.

Give writing a try. Give curiosity a try.