Tuesday’s post about constructive criticism (Constructive Criticism Gone Awry (As a Receiver)), especially my “unappreciative” reception, made me think about business and sales. In many ways, giving and receiving constructive criticism is similar to selling.
  • The lack of understanding (and lack of trying to understand) lost me as a receiver.The man offering the criticism came in with a solution based off a few brief observations. He did not realize that the gym is a very important place for me – my “safe haven”. As such, speaking at the gym, to me, is unwanted.
  • The validity of the man’s constructive criticism was derailed early from a misunderstood position. Again, without understanding what was happening, the man stated I was being rude by not facing another man – the chiropractor. He did not observe how I was pointing and craning my neck in various positions while talking to a knownchiropractor. How quickly, then, I dismissed his observation.
  • The lack of empathy creates friction and defensiveness. I want to hammer home this point – for successful criticism, product, or service [sale], empathy is imperative. Being a 3rd party observer, the perspective can be objective. However, coming in with a harsh hypothesis can create unwarranted tension – hypotheses such as being rude, the business prospect’s process is broken, etc. Influence without empathy falls on deaf ears.

As a receiver of constructive criticism and a prospect for many products and services, I get it. I want to be the best version of myself. For my company, I want us to excel. That means I am open for feedback and useful products or services. Approach tactfully and with empathy.

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