Last week, I posted one of the most important blog posts since I started except… I lied. I didn’t quite take that vacation/ break.
I haven’t taken a vacation in quite a while. Even in late December and early January when I went to Orlando and San Fran for family vacations, I worked. A lot. This past Thursday, I still ended up working 6-7 hours even after everyone at work messaged me to get offline.
It’s a hard to be “okay” to turn off. Early in the week, I handled several marketing tasks, but I hadn’t finished any of my sales and customer success tasks. These efforts boiled over into Thursday, my supposed time off.
Having lived through the roller coaster of Body Boss and then last year’s anxiety-filled summer, knowing to turn off and actually doing so is a work-in-progress. In fact, like working out, exercising vulnerability, speaking, writing, etc., taking time off should be a constant practice.
Harvard Business Review has a great article about resilience – “Resilience Is About How You Recharge, Not How You Endure”. It’s a great reminder that we, as a society, like to applaud the men and women who continue to “grind it out”. However, grinding it out leads to burning out. The brain is like a muscle – requiring time to recharge.
Professional athletes exert exemplary effort in bursts (games) but set aside time to recover. Without recovery time, athletes become susceptible to injury and operate below-par.
So, the moral of today’s post: taking time off is a constant practice. It’s easy to prescribe others to take time off, but it can be hard for us to take the very medicine we prescribe. It’s a constant practice and process that requires diligence with an eye towards the greater goal.

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