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Everyone Needs a Don

The other night an old friend came by needing help to create a marketing campaign. Her store was launching, but she was having all sorts of trouble sending out a couple email campaigns.

She had already visited the company’s offices after getting zero help from Support. (Yes, you do that when you’re desperate and looking for answers.) She had sought the help from friends who used to work at the company or knew of those who did. No one was able to help.

Surprisingly, I was the last resort. (Because I’m really not that technical.) But perhaps for good reason — I knew Don Pottinger. 1030PM on a Sunday night, and I knew that I could still hit him up for help on resolving my friend’s problem.

After an hour, though, we were still stumped. But here’s the difference between all the other tiers of support my friend went through: Don kept on pushing. He kept researching and troubleshooting. Coincidentally, he actually had some experience with email marketing given his startup (he is the CTO), is a marketing automation platform, Kevy.

Don realized the desperation of my friend, noticed her passion, and knew she tried her absolute best to figure out the problem. He saw someone who needed help… needed his expertise. So there’s Don, now 11:30PM on a Sunday night… CTO of an early-stage startup… with three kids under the age of 3… staying up to research and help a friend of a friend. Perhaps, he also enjoyed the challenge.

By midnight, he figured out a couple issues, and my friend was able to launch her campaigns successfully. Today, she’s even switched over to Kevy.

What my friend experienced with Don is what I experience all the time from him, and from what many others experience with Don. That is, he’ll push and push to help. He isn’t able to help everyone, but he recognizes those who have put in the effort, warrant his help. He’s passionate about entrepreneurship and helping entrepreneurs. He’s reliable when you need him.

Everyone needs a Don. Luckily, I’ve got one, and a few other Don-like friends.

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