I was talking to a wantrepreneur recently who was having a tough time getting started on her idea. She felt overwhelmed not knowing where to begin. Stopping her from starting was her own grand ambitions.
This is pretty common – this paralysis of too much and the unknown. However, we (this wantrepreneur included) can take a step back and realize startups aren’t short-term sprints – they’re marathons (of sprints).
Successful startups don’t happen overnight. Instead, they are successful from learning and iterating. It’s not about that initial jump, but sustained persistence. If we think about it this way, then we can think about approaching our ideas like we approach habit creation.
An anecdote from my life: I wanted to write my book two years ago. I had a couple false-starts where I typed up a couple pages and stopped. I kept stopping because I felt how daunting it was to start from PAGE 1 of a book of XYZ many pages. I believed in what I wanted to do, but it was a massive mountain to climb.
Last November, I decided to write the book again, but with another approach. I listed out all the chapters of the book, and made a decision to two chapters of the book till completion. I attached micro-goals to my macro-goal. Within 10 days, I had the first iteration of my book.
Gregory Ciotti of 99u.com refers to this as “micro and macro quotas”. Before when I stared at page 1 of XYZ, I looked at it as page 1 of chapter 1.
Instead of looking at the whole grand idea and being intimidated by the grandiose, create a plan (that will change), and create micro goals of what to accomplish each day. Build the idea as if you’re building a habit of success.
0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *