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My Book on Startups and Entrepreneurship is PUBLISHED!


Last week, I was excited to announce I was writing an ebook on startup and entrepreneurship. Today, I’m THRILLED to announce the book is PUBLISHED!

Postmortem of a Failed Startup: Lessons for Success is now on Amazon’s Kindle platform! I’ll probably have a couple more posts about the book in the upcoming weeks, but till then, I’ll just share with you the essentials…

You can download the book from Amazon here: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01A2NGDZ0

I wanted to give the book away for free believing in the power of “free” for greater reach, but Amazon wants some money for their distribution. So, it’s actually $0.99.

I wanted to capture all of the elements of my startup’s journey from inception to its eventual closure. Thus, I’ve written the book cradle-to-grave covering the following chapters:
  • Acknowledgements
  • Foreword **Provided by the great Don Pottinger
  • First, let me tell you about our Dream and my hopes for this book.
  • Solve a real problem with a 10X better solution.
  • Pick an industry where you have LOADS of experience.
  • Have customer-PARTNERS at the beginning.
  • Start Small and Targeted and KILL IT.
  • Aside from quality, UI and UX are more than just table stakes.
  • Be ready to pitch anytime and every time you walk outside.
  • Sales is HARD!
  • New customers are great, but existing customers are better.
  • Market like a king with a blacksmith’s earnings.
  • What gets measured gets improved.
  • Dedication to the startup is a key for agility which is a key for success.
  • Funding… ugh.
  • It’s all about the TEAM.
  • Know thyself or get real comfortable finding out.
I’m wicked excited about the book and perhaps with an equal part nervousness. It’s a highly vulnerable piece not just for its content but also because I’m not a writer by trade. I’m not paid for writing, so I can’t say my writing is good let alone great. However, there’s definitely good personality in the book, and good content informative for everyone and anyone.

Okay, that’s it for now. Check out the book! Please let me know your thoughts on Twitter @TheDLu or via email at the.daryl.lu@gmail.com.

Thanks, everyone! Hope you enjoy the book!

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