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5 Steps to Overcome the CHASM Between You and Successful Habits and Passions

Source: http://www.quotesvalley.com/images/09/motivation-is-what-gets-you-started-habit-is-what-keeps-you-going.jpg
Recently, I got a chance to sit down with the President and co-founder of IRUNURUN, Travis Dommert. Met him walking down the street of Piedmont with a friend. I actually yelled at my buddy from 200 yards away. It's funny how things work.

Anyways, great guy with some deep thinking. We talked a little about irunurun, especially sharing some experiences from Body Boss, and how he and his team are pivoting slightly towards building more sustainable habits after watching how users were tracking and engaging in their run-tracking platform. Now, irunurun is...
IRUNURUN is a performance and accountability app designed to help people and organizations achieve through focus, consistency, and accountability. 
If you've been reading my blog regularly or at least ​a few articles, you'll know my interest in psychology and passion-pursuits. So Travis and I had a great talk, and it made me think more about building sustainable habits. But there was this one idea that really hit me and made a lot of sense -- the Gap vs. the CHASM.

I wrote about Getting Over the Gap previously, but I hadn't thought about the follow-up CHASM that exists. It makes sense. That is, getting over the gap is really tough, but getting over the chasm is REALLY, REALLY TOUGH. Crossing the chasm is consistently​ doing (vs. just doing) and can be referred to as "mastery". This is where many people, I've seen not make it over.

I've seen entrepreneurs take the plunge and just after building an MVP (or oftentimes more than), watch traction not quite be where they dreamed, and they call it wraps without actually trying to find out why or how to pivot. There's a saying to "fail fast", but don't quit prematurely. I've seen others find the financial burden of jumping off the original gap​ (and off a full-time gig) quickly swimming back to the full-time safety net. I don't see enough people really endure and knock through walls where challenges exist; instead, wanting to turn back around. I'm not saying I'm not one of those to have turned around in some points, but maybe this opens my eyes on how to succeed.

Real back-of-the-napkin stuff right here… See the CHASM? It’s huge. Have your five steps grounded in your WHY to reach mastery
Travis described there being five stepping stones to help get over the chasm... each, anchored in a bedrock of some purpose -- the "why". I think my business school professor for an Innovation class would be thrilled to hear me say this. The five stepping blocks are:
  1. ​Clarity - What's the goal? What's the purpose? Who's the team? Etc. This is mostly living and breathing and will need to adapt over time.
  2. Rhythm - Build a cadence that is sustainable, and sticking to it. I like to reflect on this story about how a guy did a "life hack" by getting up everyday at 4:30AM for 21 days. Except, he didn't do it everyday straight. Instead, he focused on the weekdays because he knew that he couldn't sustain early days on the weekends.
  3. Accountability - Who are you accountable to? For me, I'm accountable, largely, to me and I can usually drive my feet towards a goal. However, accountability can also come from work colleagues, friends, saying publicly you're going to do something (like buddy Matt performing 100 asks for 100 days).
  4. Reinforcement - What enables you to consistently achieve what you need to achieve? In some ways, this can be the incentives. Lean more on the intrinsic vs. extrinsic motivators most will say.
  5. Leadership​ - In many ways in entrepreneurship, this can be you and kind of you alone. However, you can also lean on mentors and co-founders or even idols to lead you. Though, it'd best be someone or some example that you can have some direct interaction with.

​The five steps are from Travis, but the rest was in my terms of understanding. Let's see if I got it right when he reads this (and potentially corrects me). The biggest stepping stones that I find people having trouble with is in Rhythm and perhaps the bedrock of their Purpose. Whether it's finding time to workout in the morning, building a new business, or any other transformation, it's imperative to find the balance that works for you (Rhythm). Part of that may include taking a step back and uncovering what it is that really drives you, not just motivates, but really DRIVES you (Purpose/ Why).

** As an aside and for bonus points, I thoroughly enjoyed Simon Sinek's TED talk "Start with Why". Good talk on what really drives people, and it's not the "what" that a company does, but the "why". My good friend Michael Flanigan, Co-Founder of innovation leaders Covello, recently shared his thoughts where in the [near] future companies will all need to have a humanizing element to be successful and sustainable.

What are your thoughts about the five steps to overcoming the CHASM? Are we missing a step? 

Comments

  1. Daryl - Thanks for sharing thoughts from our meeting with your blog audience! As well, I agree with your assessment that people struggle most with Rhythm and Purpose...especially in the workplace. Leaders, you need to model this for your people. Communicate it loudly (with words if absolutely necessary). Run hard! -Travis

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    1. Thanks for sharing and elaborating, Travis!

      Great talk.

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