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Engage Beyond the Persona and Into the Internal Narrative

Target persona is a marketer’s depiction of the profile of a single target consumer. Typically, persona includes the demographic profile of an individual. It may also include the motivations of the individual. For Body Boss, target personas included high school football coaches, collegiate strength and conditioning coaches, collegiate football coaches, professional baseball coaches, etc. Understanding the internal narrative of any persona could be the difference between making a genuine connection (and sale) or being swept aside with the rest of spam.
Google “internal narrative”, and you are left with how to write one, change one, or mixed in with “internal monologue”. My back-of-the-napkin definition is “personal story”.
Marrying the idea of internal narrative with persona would be a crude way of applying something specific and powerful to something otherwise abstract. Instead, internal narrative should be applied to the exact person being engaged with (in sales) – highlight “intern…
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3 Entrepreneurial Lessons from Backing Into My Girlfriend’s Car

It’s been a while since I took a real-world “funny event” and pulled entrepreneurship lessons from it – notables include being attacked by a ninja cat and then the intruder at 4AM.
Let me share with you how excited I am about being in a new relationship – I backed into my new girlfriend’s car. It was a typical Sunday morning heading to the gym. Except this time, I added a nice dent to her driver door and my passenger-side rear bumper.
I don’t normally have cars parked where she parked, and I was on auto-pilot. Sadly, auto-pilot does not include auto-awareness. No excuses here – I should’ve been watching.
Quick lessons: Comfort can breed complacency. I was comfortable in my Sunday morning routine – comfortable in driveway routine. Add in a wrinkle such as a car in an unusual position, and I fail to realize it. Be mindful. Always.Technology still requires attention. I have a rearview camera and backup sensors. None of it matters if I don’t pay them attention. Backup sensors work well w…

Book Review: You Can’t Teach a Kid to Ride a Bike at a Seminar

In keeping with my theme of sales books this year, I read David Sandler’s You Can’t Teach A Kid To Ride A Bike At A Seminar. Sandler is also the founder of the sales training company with hundreds of franchise locations across the world – Sandler Sales Institute.
I was recommended this book from a former Sandler sales trainer as one of the preeminent books on sales like SPIN Selling and The Challenger Sale. It was one of the first books to break down the complex sales process, and was written to heavily qualify sales opportunities. The gist, like SPIN, was to get the prospect to qualify themselves and want to buy vs. the sales rep selling.
I admit this wasn’t my favorite sales book. It wouldn’t be in my top “self-help” books. However, I think I need to re-read the book to better understand the pieces of the book. As it stands, I was thrown off by the many self-promotions of the book and its clear lead for the Sandler Training courses.
All that being said, here were my top take-aways: S…

Book Review: What Got You Here, Won’t Get You Here

Recently finished Marshall Goldsmith and Mark Reiter’s What Got You Here, Won’t Get You Here. It was cited in a meeting with a startup cofounder as a helpful book for his own success (and his company’s).
Off the bat, I was expecting a busy book of sorts, but instead, realized that the “You” in the title was more about YOU. The context shifted quickly, and I wasn’t prepared for it. Meanwhile, I didn’t know what to expect, let alone chapters and break-downs of how those who wish to ascend to greater success must constantly improve… starting with the things that – shall we say – rub people the wrong way. Yes, the book actually delved into character faults.
Goldsmith dives into 20 habits/ faults/ common rubs describing situations, ways to catch them, importance of resolving, resolutions, and some anecdotal results.
Here were some of my take-aways: The book starts out acknowledging readers and leaders have all reached where they are, but that it may not actually help get them to the top.…

Rules of Writing

As I thought about how to start this post, I wanted to say, “I’m not a writer”. Except, I write – a lot. It’s fair to say, then, I’m a writer. I wasn’t always a writer, and I can’t comment if I’m good or not. I can say, however, that I am always improving.
Take this forum of “The ‘Rules’ of Writing” from StackOverflow. It’s fun to read what advice others give for effective writing. Here are some of my favorites: Show, don't tell. This one hits home perhaps because of my former online dating profiles. Yes, I said it. Too often, people state they’re “nice, like to travel, funny”. It’s incredibly generic and easy for anyone to say this. Instead, a well-written profile and accompanying pictures say much more, concisely, and accurately.Give yourself permission to suck. Maybe I do this all the time? J Point is that when you relinquish the need to be good, let alone perfect, you get to write. You get to post. You become a writer.Write, don't edit. I adopted this perhaps 150 posts ago …

Where We Stand In Free Agent Nation

I heard the term “free agent nation” recently that I hadn’t heard before. The speaker described free agent nation as the population of folks who detached themselves from large corporations and more or less worked for themselves. Years ago, “lifers” were common place. Then, employees felt their security in corporations dwindle. Companies saw employees as expendable resources. Employees reacted by regarding companies as expendable as well – loyalty was rare for either side.
Googling “free agent nation”, I found an article published on December 31, 1997 titled “Free Agent Nation” by Daniel Pink, author of Drive and To Sell Is Human. Daniel interviewed a number of folks who left the corporate world to be independents/ contractors. This was all fascinating given my foray into independent consulting and entrepreneurship coupled with known colleagues striking out on their own.
Daniel pointed out driving free agents were ideals in value alignment and flexibility. For many independents Danie…

What You Want vs. What You Choose

Want vs. choose. Sounds simple, right? Take a second, though, and think about what you want. What about what you choose. How different are they? Why? This question came about after hearing this concept from the book I am currently reading. I wanted a Tesla earlier this year. Instead, I chose a Toyota 4Runner. Of course, I also wanted a 4Runner, but due to the Tesla X’s $100+K price tag, I chose the vehicle that was a fraction of the cost.I could have also chosen a very simple 4Runner let alone a little Toyota Corolla. Instead, I chose the Limited set-up with 4x4. I wanted this more than the base SR5 package.If I was to step back further, my previous vehicle (2007 Toyota 4Runner Limited 4x4 with 115K miles) was still working great. It was all paid off. Yet, I chose to increase my personal burn rate by several hundreds of dollars because of want. This, despite wanting to return to startup and entrepreneurship after my time at SalesWise – a life change which would likely provide meager f…